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Nowhere to Run

by Michael Crowley

What’s a fair punishment for stealing a watch?

It’s 1788 and Jacob Jones has been sentences to seven year’s labour in Australia. The work is hot, hard and dangerous.

Will Jacob find a way to escape? Or is there nowhere to run?

Nowhere to Run made me think about morals plus how lucky we are today in prison and sentences we get.’

 

Prisoner, HMP Eastwood Park

‘Very gripping and very good reading. Excellent!’

 

Prisoner, HMP Rye Hill

ISBN: 9781908713056

Look Inside

Read the first two chapters:

What do you think?

The book includes ‘What do you think?’ questions that will help readers to better empathize with the characters of the story and questions that encourage personal reflection, such as:

  • How do you think Jacob felt about being transported to Australia? Was it better or worse than being sent to jail or even hanged in England?

  • How should we react if someone in authority asks us to do something that we don’t agree with?

  • When might it be OK to do something that is wrong to protect someone else?

  • Do punishments like flogging and hanging work? Why or why not?

  • Can you think of a time when you have chosen to stay and solve a problem rather than walk away from it?

Themes in the book

Readers could be encouraged to discuss and reflect on the following themes:

  • peer pressure

  • teamwork

  • loneliness

  • keeping your word

  • getting along with people from other cultures

  • issues around the treatment of prisoners

  • dealing with the consequences of your actions

  • planning for the future

  • building positive relationships

  • choice and personal responsibility

About the author

Michael Crowley is a published writer and has written for the stage, BBC radio and film. He teaches creative writing at Sheffield Hallam University and was writer in residence at HM YOI Lancaster Farms between 2007 and 2013. In 2013 he was short-listed for a Butler Trust Award for services to criminal justice in regard to his writing work with prisoners.